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Conscious consumers, conscious creators

I find some of the definitions of “to consume” interesting and thought provoking…

  • To expend; use up
  • To be destroyed, expended, or wasted
  • To squander

It is in this way that a “consumer society” is the exact opposite of a “creative society”. To create is to…

  • cause to exist; bring into being
  • give rise to; produce
  • produce through artistic or imaginative effort

There is alot talked about with regards to conscious consumerism, less so about consciously creating. This reflects the underlying economic and psychological structuring upon which our society is currently founded, whereby individuals perceive themselves (often unconsciously) primarily as consumers.

Over consumption of course is founded upon a massive wave of material creation. The trouble is that we have consigned creation to the margins of our collective consciousness. Creation now happens largely unseen behind factory walls, in the absence of witnessing presence, either from the individual consciousness or collectively.

Objects produced come about largely by mechanical means. Not that there is anything wrong inherently with mechanization. The problem is not one of mechanical production, but of the absence of a loving, witnessing, creative consciousness in the processes of creation. This loving witnessing presence can be either an individual craftsman, OR a co-operative of workers who create the conditions in which they can work, rest and play in a way that cultivates consciousness and awareness.

The universe is a creative phenomena, human beings are especially creative animals. Our creating will continue whether we are collectively conscious of this process or not. It can seem difficult for the individual, in the face of such overwhelmingly massive and embedded structures organizing our living, to know what to do to change things for the better.

Much “green” activity and discussion focuses on conscious consumerism, and this is a good starting point. Being conscious of the manner in which the goods that we purchase are produced is a very good way forward. However the focus on conscious consumerism misses the fundamental underlying psychological and economic assumptions underpinning the world we have created –

one that shapes the great majority of individuals to perceive themselves primarily as consumers and not creators.

In order to create the change that many of wish to see, it is necessary not only to become conscious of our consumerism. We need all in some small way to begin to become conscious of ourselves as creators. In doing so we nudge the balance of our lives, so that our underpinning self perception shifts away from being primarily “consumers” to inhabiting a position of balance between being both consumers AND creators.

In giving attention to becoming conscious creators, we also learn how to become creators of our own destiny. When we allow others to hold all responsibility for creation, then we also will tend to give away the keys to defining and creating the lives that we would like to live. Through learning to become creators ourselves – HOWEVER we approach that – we also begin to learn how to manifest our vision and soul purpose.

Beginning to embark on any creative project from taking up knitting to making an allotment can shift the balance of our life from consumerism towards creation, opening up with it a whole world of possibility we couldn’t see before. We contribute towards a collective consciousness shift, nudging the tipping point from a consumer society back towards a creative one every time we:

* write a poem
* knit a scarf
* give attention to creating a beautiful meal
* tend our allotments

It is in this way that every single conscious creative act is also a radical act, contributing to both our own individual growth and collective global change.

Make today a creative one 🙂

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